New Story – Don’t Fear the Reaper – The Arcanist

My flash fiction piece, “Don’t Fear the Reaper,” is featured on The Arcanist. It’s also on Tales from The Arcanist, the corresponding podcast available right on the page with the story or via Spotify.

“Don’t Fear the Reaper” is a short, uncomfortable moment from the future, a piece of science fiction imagining how the mundane will prevail forever. Nothing to do with cowbell. It’s only 650 words, so check it out.

Thanks so much to The Arcanist for sharing my story. They send one story a week right to your inbox if you subscribe.

Book Review – Artificial Gut Feeling – Anna Zett

Artificial Gut Feeling : Anna Zett (author) : 9781916425033 ...

My review of Anna Zett’s Artificial Gut Feeling is up now on Full Stop Magazine. From the review:

Would an artificial instinct, an artificial gut feeling, be determined by the material form of the gut? For example, the wiring within a computer. Would the conditions of its physical existence define the ways its “body” would influence how its intellect made meaning? In the titular story of their new fiction collection, Artificial Gut Feeling, Anna Zett imagines what meaning would derive from the artificial gut feeling. Turns out it’s a suicidal desire for self-immolation; wired systems dream of self-destructing from the heat/excrement produced when they run.

Though Zett’s collection is presented as “personal science fiction,” the work is not easily identified with genre. For example, the heat/excrement metaphor is reminiscent of Georges Bataille’s 1927 essay, The Solar Anus, where heat and light are the excrement of the sun and existence is a cycle of things living within the excrement of others. Invoking a proto-postmodernist like Bataille reflects that Artificial Gut Feeling will appeal more to readers of Judith Butler and Elaine Scarry than fans of Octavia Butler or Liu Cixin. In this science fiction, science provides metaphors for postmodern feminist theory. Zett has clearly researched the science at the foundation of these metaphors, especially electricity and neurotransmitters, and the result is engaging, unique, and insightful.

Read the review on Full Stop.

Get the book from Divided Publishing or Amazon.

Book Review – Future Tense Fiction – Multiple Authors

Image result for future tense fiction

I’m really happy I had the chance to review Future Tense Fiction (Unnamed Press, 2019) for Full Stop Magazine. The collection brought together writers I’m familiar with, like Paolo Bacigalupi and Nnedi Okorafor, and writers who are new to me, like Mark Oshiro and Deji Bryce Olukotun. Of course, my familiarity reveals little about a writer’s success, and actually all the writers in this anthology are a who’s-who of the best contemporary science fiction writers.

On reason I like this collection so much is that Slate originally published all the stories and paired them with articles from scientists and other contemporary experts, adding a level commentary to the stories. That commentary, along with the collection’s focus on contemporary science and social issues, makes Future Tense Fiction a trove for a college instructor like me who teaches sci fi, literature, and composition. Just this semester I’m using Okorafor’s “Mother of Invention,” Oshiro’s “No Me Dejas,” Olukotun’s “When We Were Patched” and Maureen McHugh’s “Starfish Girl” in my courses. I also teach a Bacigalupi story (The Gambler), though not the one from the collection.

My faithful science fiction book club have also enjoyed the anthology. The stories demand conversation and the writing quality is excellent. Again, it’s a great way to get a feel for the most innovative and contemporary science fiction writers all in one place. I’m looking forward to branching out into these writers’ other work.

My review of Future Tense Fiction is here on Full Stop Magazine.

Purchase the book from Unnamed Press Here.

Read the stories and articles here on Slate.com.